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Agriculture and Career Education
Orientation to Energy Horticulture Production Management  

Basic Agriculture Careers
Prerequisite: Freshman, Sophomore, or Junior status

In this course, theory and hands-on experiences provide opportunities for students to develop basic knowledge and skills in agricultural mechanics. Instructional areas include the basic fundamentals of maintaining and repairing small gasoline engines, basic electricity, welding, construction, cold metal work, and operating agricultural equipment safely. Improving workplace and computer skills will be a focus.


Orientation to Transportation

This course introduces students to the basic skills needed to inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks that run on gasoline, electricity, or alternative fuels. Instructional units include engine performance, automotive electrical system, integrated computer systems, lubrication, exhaust and emission control, steering and suspension, fuel systems, cooling system, braking, and power train.
Prerequisite to Ag Mechanics

Agricultural Mechanics and Tech
Preqreuisite: Basic Ag

This course will concentrate on expanding student’s knowledge and experiences with agricultural mechanics technologies utilized in the agricultural industry. Units of instruction included are: design, construction, fabrication, maintenance, welding, electricity/electronics, internal combustion engines, hydraulics, and employability skills. Careers of agricultural construction engineer, electrician, plumber, welder, equipment designer, parts manager, safety inspector, welder, and other related occupations will be examined. Improving workplace and computer skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

Orientation to Manufacturing
Prerequisite: None
Length of Course: One Semester
Credit: 0.5
Suggested interest and abilities: Interest in welding, manufacturing and shop procedures. Good hand/eye coordination. Ability to follow directions and procedures.

This course is designed to allow students to develop knowledge in concepts of manufacturing. This course will be based on a 50 percent classroom, 50 percent lab approach. It will emphasize basic manufacturing skill, procedures, practices and general shop safety issues. Targeted areas of learning will focus on welding joint types and preparation, arc welding (stick) and oxy-acetylene welding in flat positions, along with oxy-acetylene cutting and heat treating.


Agriculture Metal Fabrication
Prerequisite: Basic Ag

Agriculture welding courses provide students with the skills and knowledge that are specifically applicable to the tools and equipment used in the agricultural industry. In learning to apply basic industrial knowlege and skills (engines, power, welding, and carpentry, among others), students may explore a broad range of topics, includding the operation, mechanics, and care of farm tools and machines; the construction and repair of structures integral to farm operations; an introduction or review of electricity and power; and safety procedures.


Orientation to Communications
Prerequisite: None
Length of course: 1 Semester
Credits per Semester: 0.5

This course is designed to allow students to develop knowledge of concepts in the major industrial communication tool-drafting. This class will prove to be valuable if you are considering entering the field of architecture, interior design, landscaping,engineering, surveyor, or computer aided drafting. There are many technical drawing professions. A skilled designer depends on graphic communications as a tool for selling ideas. Technical drawing skills can be the basis for all successful graphic presentations and technical documents. this course will cover lettering, one view, and three view drawings. Students will also learn the various drafting tools used to complete the drafting projects. During the course we will discuss the many professions or careers directly related to drafting.


Drafting I
Prerequisite: Orientation to Communication Technology
Length of course: 1 Semester
Credits per semester: 0.5

This course is for students who are interested in careers in drafting, design, architecture, construction management, interior design, graphic arts, engineering, and other related professions. Students will learn to make drawings and floor plans in the same manner as professionals. Drawings will be made with hand tools and also with computer aided drafting programs. The operations completed will include shape, description, revisions, and modifications to completed drawings.


Orientation to Energy Technology
Prerequisite: None
Length of course: 1 Semester
Credits per semester: 0.5

This course is designed to allow students to develop knowledge of concepts in the distribution, conservation, and utilization of energy systems. An understanding will be developed in scientific and mathematical concepts that support energy systems. The extraction, processing, and conversion of our energy resources that can produce electricity will also be studied, General electrical safety with conductors and insulators will be covered. Applied learning activities of residential wiring methods covering outlets, GFCI, switches,and breakers will also be taught

 


Energy Utilization
Prerequisite: *Orientation to Energy Technology

This course covers basic digital gates and binary numbers, AC/DC and digital meters.

Length of course: 1 Semester
0.5 credits high school
3.0 credits Rend Lake College (Substitutes for Basic Electronics for Technicians INEL1291)

*Lab fee required ($10)


Orientation to Construction

This course provides experiences related to the erection, installation, and maintenance of residential buildings and related fixtures. Planned learning activities allow students to understand fundamental principles and methods, and develop technical skills related to masonry, carpentry, and finish work. Instruction includes safety principles and practices, recognition of standard lumber sizes, foundation layout methods, building concepts and procedures, local, state, and national codes, cost estimating, and blueprint reading.
Prerequisite to Ag Construction

Agricultural Construction and Technology
Prerequisite: Sophomore & Basic Ag

This advanced course focuses on the knowledge, hands-on skills, and work place skills applicable to construction in the agricultural industry. Major units of instruction include: personal safety, hand tools, power tools, blue print reading, surveying, construction skills in carpentry, plumbing, electricity, concrete, block laying, drywall and painting.


Natural Resources Conservation and Managment
Grade Levels: 10-12
Credits: 1 Full Year
(ISBE ID: 18504A002)

CTE Course

This course develops management and conservation skills in understanding the connection between agriculture and natural resources. Student knowledge and skills are developed in: understanding natural resources and its importance; fish, wildlife, and forestry management and conservation; and exploring outdoor recreational enterprises. Hunting and fishing as a sport, growing and managing tree forests, and outdoor safety education will be featured. Career exploration will be discussed including: park ranger, game warden, campground manager, forester, conservation officer, wildlife manager, and related occupations. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.


Introduction to Agricultural Industry



Agricultural Business Management

This course will provide students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to manage personal finances and develop into a successful entrepreneur and/or businessperson. Instructional units include: business ownership types, starting an agribusiness, managing and operating an agribusiness, financing an agribusiness, managing personal finances, record keeping and financial management of an agribusiness, local, state, and federal taxes, agricultural law, and developing employability skills. Student skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, and writing through agribusiness applications. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.


Basic Horticulture
Grades: 9-11
Length of Course: 1 Semester
Credits: 0.5

General Horticulture courses expose students to the art and science of growing plants, shrubs, trees, flowers, fruits, and vegetables. In doing so, they cover a wide variety of topics, including greenhouse and nursery operations, soils and media mixtures, fruit and vegetable production, turf/golf course management, interior and exterior plantscaping, irrigation systems, weed and pest control, and floral design.


Horticultural Production and Mgt.
Prerequisite: Intro to Ag or consent of Instructor - Grade Levels 11-12

Lenght of Course: 1 Semester
Credits: 0.5
(ISBE ID:18051A001)

This advanced course offers instruction in both the greenhouse production and landscape areas of horticulture.  Units of study include plant identification, greenhouse management, growing greenhouse crops, landscape design, installation, and maintenance, horticulture mechanics, nursery management, and turf production.  Agribusiness units will cover operating a horticultural business, pricing work, advertising, and sales.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

Ag Leadership
Grade Level: Junior & Senior
Length of Course: Year
Credits: 1 Full Year
(ISBE ID:18203A002)

Students will analyze current agricultural issues,  determine how they affect people on all sides of the issue and enhance their written and oral communication skills by presenting their views and opinions to the class through debates, speeches, and interviews in order to be effective leaders in today’s society. Students will gain the knowledge and leadership experiences to help them to become successful in life and in the workplace; thus, enhancing their potential for leadership development, personal growth, and career success. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.


Agronomy
Grade Levels: Junior & Senior
Credits: 1 Full Year
(ISBE ID:18051A003)

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary for future employment in the agronomy or related industries.  Major units of instruction include scientific method, cellular biology, genetics, biotechnology, soil classifications, soil erosion and management, soil fertility, plant classification, plant anatomy and physiology, plant propagation, plant growth, integrated pest management, grain, oil, forage, sugar, and fiber crop production methods, grain quality, grain storage, and grain transportation.  Applied science and math skills and concepts will be stressed throughout the course as they relate to each area. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.


Applied Vocational Math

Applied Math courses reinforce general math skills, extend these skills to include some pre-algebra and algebra topics, and use these skills in a variety of practical, consumer, business, and occupational applications. Course topics typically include rational numbers, measurement, basic statistics, ratio and proportion, basic geometry, formulas, and simple equations.


Introdution to Engineering and Technologies
Prerequisite: "C" average or above in Algebra II OR "B" average or above in Geometry.

This course will cover various STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math) areas and connections with the real world. Topics and activities will incorporate technology tosolve real world problems while using previously taught math and science concepts. Students will explore multiple engineering and technology fields with guest speakers and activities. This course will incorporate computer programming, robotics, various technology resources, forensics, rockets, etc. Prerequisite: passed Algebra II with a C or better.


Veterinary Technology
Grade Levels: Juniors & Seniors
Lenght of Course: Year
Credits:
1 Unit
(ISBE ID:18105A001)

This course will develop students’ understanding of the small and companion animal industry, animal anatomy and physiology, animal ethics and welfare issues, animal health, veterinary medicine, veterinary office practices, and animal services to humans.  Career exploration will focus on veterinarian, veterinary lab technicians, office lab assistant, small animal production, research lab assistant, and animal nutrition lab technician. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.



Animal Science
(ISBE ID:18101A002)
Length of course: Full Year
24 Max Students
Grade Level: 9-12

 This course will develop students’ understanding of the livestock (beef, dairy, sheep, goats, and swine), poultry, and large (equine) animal industry. Topics of instruction include scientific investigations, genetics, animal anatomy and physiology, animal nutrition, animal reproduction, animal health, and meat science. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 


 

 

 



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